Sunday, January 22, 2012

Adobo, The Best Philippine Dish Ever!


Adobo refers to a ordinary and very standard cooking process native at this time in the Philippines. The generally famous of all at this time in the Philippines is the chicken adobo.

According to the history (reference: Investigate only),as Spanish colonizers initially took ended the Philippines in in the dead of night 1500s and ahead of schedule 1600s, they encountered an native cooking process which involved stewing with vinegar.

Spanish called or identify this as an "adobo," the Spanish word pro a little something or marinade. Thus, giving way to the famous Chicken Adobo.

All dishes prepared in this style eventually came to be renowned by this first name, with the first stretch pro the dish currently lost to history.

Thus, the adobo dish and cooking process in Filipino cuisine and the all-purpose class "adobo" in Spanish cuisine share akin characteristics, but in detail refer to uncommon things with uncommon cultural roots. While Philippine adobo can be considered adobo - a marinated dish - in the Spanish significance, the Philippine treatment is much more point.

Adobo is the first name of a standard dish and cooking process in Philippine cuisine with the intention of involves meat or seafood marinated in a sauce of vinegar and garlic, browned in smear with oil, and simmered in the marinade.


Pork adobo, with vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, onions, black interrupt, and pineapples.


Chicken adobo

Although it has a first name taken from the Spanish, the cooking method is native to the Philippines. When the Spanish subject the Philippines in the in the dead of night 16th century and ahead of schedule 17th century, they encountered an native cooking process which involved stewing with vinegar, which they at that time referred to as adobo, which is the Spanish word pro a little something or marinade. Dishes prepared in this style eventually came to be renowned by this first name, with the first stretch pro the dish currently lost to history.
While the adobo dish and cooking process in Filipino cuisine and the all-purpose class of adobo in Spanish cuisine share akin characteristics, they refer to uncommon things with uncommon cultural roots. While the Philippine adobo dish can be considered adobo in the Spanish sense—a marinated dish—the Philippine treatment is much more point. Typically, pork or chicken, or a combination of both, is unhurriedly cooked in vinegar, crushed garlic, bay leaf, black peppercorns, and soy sauce at that time often browned in the oven or pan-fried next to make the wanted crisped edges.

Adobo has been called the prototypical Philippine heat, served with rice both by day after day meals and by feasts. It is commonly packed pro Filipino mountaineers and travelers since it keeps well lacking refrigeration. Its relatively long shelf-life is due to lone of its primary ingredients, vinegar, which inhibits the growth of bacteria.

Outside of the home-cooked dish, the essence of adobo has been urban commercially and adapted to other foods. A digit of thriving community Philippine snack products ordinarily mark their items "adobo flavored." This assortment includes, but is not restricted to nuts, chips, noodle soups, and corn crackers.

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